• 3700 Joseph Siewick Drive, Suite 101, Fairfax, VA 22033
  • (703) 698-1856

Minimally Invasive Treatments (Robotic Surgery)

  • Robotic Prostatectomy (Complete Prostate Removal)

    A Robotic Prostatectomy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure which uses finely controlled robotic instruments to completely remove the prostate safely, while enhancing patient recovery and outcome. Robotic prostatectomy is gaining popularity as a less traumatic and minimally invasive prostate cancer treatment. “Minimally invasive” means that instead of operating on patients through large incisions, we use miniaturized surgical instruments that fit through a series of quarter-inch incisions. When performing surgery with the da Vinci Si—the world’s most advanced surgical robot—these miniaturized instruments are mounted on three separate robotic arms, allowing the surgeon maximum range of motion and precision. The da Vinci’s fourth arm contains a magnified high-definition 3-D camera that guides the surgeon during the procedure.
  • Laparoscopic Nephrectomy (Partial or Complete Kidney Removal)

    Laparoscopic Nephrectomy provides patients with a safe and effective way to partially or completely remove a diseased or cancerous kidney. Laparoscopic nephrectomy is a minimally invasive technique, which provides patients with less discomfort and equivalent results when compared to the larger incision required with traditional open surgery. “Minimally invasive” means that instead of operating on patients through large incisions, we use miniaturized surgical instruments that fit through a series of quarter-inch incisions. When performing surgery with the da Vinci Si—the world’s most advanced surgical robot—these miniaturized instruments are mounted on three separate robotic arms, allowing the surgeon maximum range of motion and precision. The da Vinci’s fourth arm contains a magnified high-definition 3-D camera that guides the surgeon during the procedure. When compared to conventional open surgery, laparoscopic nephrectomy has resulted in significantly less post-operative pain, a shorter hospital stay, earlier return to work and daily activities, a more favorable cosmetic result and outcomes identical to that of open surgery.
  • Laparoscopic Pyeloplasty

    Laparoscopic Pyeloplasty is a minimally invasive procedure which provides patients a safe and effective way to perform reconstructive surgery of a narrowing or scarring where the ureter (the tube that drains urine from the kidney to the bladder) attaches to the kidney. This operation is used to correct a blockage or narrowing of the ureter where it leaves the kidney. “Minimally invasive” means that instead of operating on patients through large incisions, we use miniaturized surgical instruments that fit through a series of quarter-inch incisions. When performing surgery with the da Vinci Si—the world’s most advanced surgical robot—these miniaturized instruments are mounted on three separate robotic arms, allowing the surgeon maximum range of motion and precision. The da Vinci’s fourth arm contains a magnified high-definition 3-D camera that guides the surgeon during the procedure. When compared to the conventional open surgical technique, laparoscopic pyeloplasty has resulted in significantly less post-operative pain, a shorter hospital stay, earlier return to work and daily activities, a more favorable cosmetic result and outcomes identical to that of the open procedure.
  • Laparoscopic Stone Surgery

    Laparoscopic Stone Surgery is a minimally invasive removal of stone(s) from the ureter or collecting system of the kidney with incision(s) into the kidney. It is performed through keyhole incisions and involves insertion of a temporary ureteric stent to aid healing with cystoscopy and x-ray screening. When performing surgery with the da Vinci Si—the world’s most advanced surgical robot—these miniaturized instruments are mounted on three separate robotic arms, allowing the surgeon maximum range of motion and precision. The da Vinci’s fourth arm contains a magnified high-definition 3-D camera that guides the surgeon during the procedure. When compared to the conventional open surgical technique, laparoscopic pyeloplasty has resulted in significantly less post-operative pain, a shorter hospital stay, earlier return to work and daily activities, a more favorable cosmetic result and outcomes identical to that of the open procedure.

Urological Cancer

  • Bladder Cancer

    The bladder is a hollow organ in the pelvis with flexible, muscular walls. Its main function is to store urine before it leaves the body. Bladder cancer begins when abnormal cells in the urinary bladder begin to grow uncontrollably. As more cancer cells develop, they can form a tumor and spread to other areas of the body.
  • Kidney Cancer

    The kidneys are a pair of bean-shaped organs, each about the size of a fist that are attached to the upper back wall of the abdomen and protected by the lower rib cage. Kidney cancer is the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells in the kidney. Cancer develops when the body’s normal control mechanism stops working. Old cells do not die and instead grow out of control, forming new, abnormal cells. These extra cells may form a mass of tissue, called a tumor. Cells in nearly any part of the body can become cancer, and can spread to other areas.
  • Prostate Cancer

    The prostate is below the bladder and in front of the rectum. The prostate is a gland that makes some of the fluid that is part of semen and found only in males. The size of the prostate grows with age. In younger men, it is about the size of a walnut, however it can be much larger in older men. Just behind the prostate are glands called seminal vesicles that make most of the fluid for semen. The urethra, which is the tube that carries urine and semen out of the body through the penis, goes through the center of the prostate. Prostate cancer is the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells in the prostate. Cancer develops when the body’s normal control mechanism stops working. Old cells do not die and instead grow out of control, forming new, abnormal cells. These extra cells may form a mass of tissue, called a tumor. Cells in nearly any part of the body can become cancer, and can spread to other areas.
  • Testicular Cancer

    Testicles are part of the male reproductive system. These 2 organs are each normally a little smaller than a golf ball in adult males and are contained within a sac of skin called the scrotum. The scrotum hangs beneath the base of the penis. Cancer that starts in the testicles is called testicular cancer. Testicular cancer is the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells the body’s normal control mechanism stops working. Old cells do not die and instead grow out of control, forming new, abnormal cells. These extra cells may form a mass of tissue, called a tumor. Cells in nearly any part of the body can become cancer, and can spread to other areas.

Kidney Stone Treatments

  • Kidney Stones

    Urine contains many dissolved minerals and salts therefore, when your urine has high levels of these minerals and salts, you can form stones. Kidney stones can start small but can grow larger in size, even filling the inner hollow structures of the kidney. Some stones stay in the kidney, and do not cause any problems while others sometimes can travel down the ureter, the tube between the kidney and the bladder. If the stone reaches the bladder, it can be passed out of the body in urine however, if the stone becomes lodged in the ureter, it blocks the urine flow from that kidney and causes pain.
  • Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL)

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) uses shock waves to break a kidney stone into small pieces. These pieces can more easily move through the urinary tract and pass from the body. During this procedure you lie on a water-filled cushion. X-rays or ultrasound tests are used to locate the stone. High-energy sound waves pass through your body without injury and break the stone into small pieces.
  • Ureteroscopy

    A Ureteroscopy is a procedure in which a small scope (like a flexible telescope) is inserted into the bladder and ureter and it is used to diagnose and treat a variety of problems in the urinary tract. For ureteral stones, it allows the urologist to look into the ureter, find the stone and remove it. The surgeon passes a tiny wire basket into the lower ureter via the bladder, grabs the stone and pulls the stone free. This is an outpatient procedure with or without a stent inserted.
  • Percutaneous Nephrostolithotomy (PCNL)

    Percutaneous nephrostolithotomy (or nephrolithotomy) is the passing of a special medical instrument through your skin into your kidney to remove kidney stones.

Men's Urological Health

  • Vasectomy

    Vasectomy is minor surgery designed to prevent pregnancy by blocking sperm from reaching the semen that is ejaculated from the penis. After a vasectomy the testes still make sperm, however it is absorbed by the body. Semen still exists, but it will be free of sperm.  Each year, more than 500,000 men in the U.S. choose vasectomy for birth control and it is the most effective method to prevent pregnancy aside from abstinence.
  • Erectile Dysfunction

    Erectile dysfunction, or ED, is the inability to achieve or sustain an erection suitable for sexual intercourse. The list of causes can vary, however some of the common reasons are; medications, chronic illnesses, poor blood flow to the penis, drinking alcohol in excess, fatigue or stress.
  • Elevated PSA

    PSA (Prostate-specific antigen) is a protein produced by normal, as well as malignant, cells of the prostate gland. The PSA test measures the level of PSA in a man’s blood. The blood level of PSA is often elevated in men with prostate cancer, and the PSA test was originally approved by the FDA in 1986 to monitor the progression of prostate cancer in men who had already been diagnosed with the disease.
  • Enlarged Prostate (BPH)

    BPH (Benign prostatic hyperplasia) is a condition in men in which the prostate gland is enlarged and not cancerous. The prostate goes through two main growth periods as a man ages. The first occurs early in puberty, when the prostate doubles in size and second phase of growth begins around age 25 and continues during most of a man’s life. BPH often occurs during the second growth phase. As the prostate enlarges, the gland presses against and pinches the urethra and the bladder wall becomes thicker. The result is that eventually, the bladder may weaken and lose the ability to empty completely, leaving some urine in the bladder. The narrowing of the urethra and urinary retention, the inability to empty the bladder completely, cause many of the problems associated with BPH.
  • Varicocele

    A varicocele is when veins inside the scrotum become enlarged. These veins are called the pampiniform plexus. Ten to 15 of every 100 males have a varicocele which is very similar to getting a varicose vein in the leg.
  • Low Testosterone

    Testosterone is a hormone that helps to maintain men’s muscle strength and mass, facial and body hair, and a deeper voice.  This hormone is key during puberty and the development of male physical features. Testosterone levels can affect men’s sex drive, erections, mood, muscle mass and bone density. Testosterone is also needed for men to produce sperm. Some men have low levels of testosterone which is also called hypogonadism, or Low-T. A man’s testosterone level normally decreases with age. Roughly 4 out of 10 men over the age of 45 have low testosterone. It is also seen in about 2 out of 10 men over 60, 3 out of 10 men over 70, and 3 out of 10 men over 80 years old.
  • Male Factor Infertility

    Male Factor Infertility is an issue of the reproductive system which makes a person unable to have children. This issue essentially fall into one of two categories: productive or obstructive. Productive relates the problem of sperm production which can be congenital (present at birth) problems with the testicle, hormone-related issues, varicose veins, environmental exposures, or cancer. Obstructive issues impair the transport of sperm to the semen. Causes for obstructive issues can stem from prior surgery, infection or congenital abnormalities (problems that are present at birth).
  • Male Incontinence

    Urinary incontinence is leaking of urine that you can’t control. Many men and women suffer from urinary incontinence. Urinary incontinence is not just a medical problem. It can affect emotional, psychological and social life. Many people who have urinary incontinence are afraid to do normal daily activities. They don’t want to be too far from a toilet. Urinary incontinence can keep people from enjoying life. Many may people think urinary incontinence is just part of getting older, however it isn’t and it can be managed or treated.
  • Overactive Bladder

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a common condition that affects millions of Americans. Overactive bladder isn’t a disease but the name of a group of urinary symptoms. The most common symptom of OAB is a sudden urge to urinate that you can’t control. Some people will leak urine when they feel the urge. Leaking urine is called “incontinence.” Having to go to the bathroom many times during the day and night is another symptom of OAB. Another common bladder problem called stress urinary incontinence (SUI), which is different from OAB. People with SUI leak urine while sneezing, laughing or doing other physical activities.

Female Urological Health

  • Non-Surgical Options

    There are various medical, behavioral and physical therapies can be use to treat certain bladder control problems.
  • Female Incontinence Surgery

    For some women, symptoms of stress incontinence or overactive bladder don’t respond to conservative treatment. When you’ve tried conservative measures and urinary incontinence continues to disrupt your life, surgery might be an option. The surgical options available to you depend on the type of urinary incontinence you have. Most options for urinary incontinence surgery treat stress incontinence. However, low-risk surgical alternatives are available for other bladder problems, including overactive bladder, also called urge incontinence or urgency-frequency syndrome.
  • Sling Procedure

    Vaginal sling procedures are types of surgeries that help control stress urinary incontinence which is the urine leakage that happens when you laugh, cough, sneeze, lift things, or exercise. This procedure helps close the urethra and bladder neck. The urethra is the tube that carries urine from the bladder to the outside and  the bladder neck is the part of the bladder that connects to the urethra.
  • Bladder Suspension Surgery

    Bladder suspension is a procedure that helps place a sagging bladder back into its normal position. Bladder suspension (or bladder neck suspension) surgery is a procedure that can be used to treat urine leakage that occurs when a person sneezes, laughs, or coughs, otherwise referred to as a condition called stress incontinence. Childbirth, as well as hormonal changes that come with menopause, can cause a woman to lose muscle tone along the pelvic floor that can lead to stress incontinence.
  • Overactive Bladder

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a common condition that affects millions of Americans. Overactive bladder isn’t a disease but the name of a group of urinary symptoms. The most common symptom of OAB is a sudden urge to urinate that you can’t control. Some people will leak urine when they feel the urge. Leaking urine is called “incontinence.” Having to go to the bathroom many times during the day and night is another symptom of OAB. Another common bladder problem called stress urinary incontinence (SUI), which is different from OAB. People with SUI leak urine while sneezing, laughing or doing other physical activities.
Dr Jonathan Mobley provides minimally invasive surgery
Da-Vinci Robotics - Minimally Invasive Surgery
Fair Urology offers vasectomy services
Enlarged Prostate (BPH)
Kidney Stone
Kidney Stone
Vasectomy Services
Vasectomy